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ELAR/SS: This Is Us: Purpose of Rules and Laws/ Getting Started

Suggested Time Frame: 7 days Instructional Days

        

Genre Focus

3.1 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:
(E)  monitor accuracy in decoding.

3.2 Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:
(C)  establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

3.3 Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to:
(A)  read aloud grade level appropriate text with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension

3.4 Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
(B)  use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or distinguish among multiple meaning words and homographs;

3.8 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

3.11 Reading/Comprehension of Text/Independent Reading. Students read independently for sustained periods of time and produce evidence of their reading. Students are expected to:
(A)  read independently for a sustained period of time and paraphrase what the reading was about, maintaining meaning and logical order (e.g., generate a reading log or journal; participate in book talks).

Figure 19 Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
(A)  establish purposes for reading selected texts based upon own or others’ desired outcome to enhance comprehension;
(B)  ask literal, interpretive, and evaluative questions of text;
(C)  monitor and adjust comprehension (e.g., using background knowledge, creating sensory images, re-reading a portion aloud, generating questions);

Writing –
3.17 Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
(A)  plan a first draft by selecting a genre appropriate for conveying the intended meaning to an audience and generating ideas through a range of strategies;
(B)  develop drafts by categorizing ideas and organizing them into paragraphs;
(C)  revise drafts for coherence,  organization, use of simple and compound sentences, and audience;
(D)  edit drafts for grammar, mechanics, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric;
(E)  publish (share) written work for a specific audience.

3.19 Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to:
(A)  write about important personal experiences.

Beginning Reading Skills

3.1 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:
(E)  monitor accuracy in decoding.

3.2 Reading/Beginning Reading/Strategies. Students comprehend a variety of texts drawing on useful strategies as needed. Students are expected to:
(C)  establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e.g., identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud).

Oral & Written Conventions

3.22 Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(B)  use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence;

3.24 Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(A)  use knowledge of letter sounds, word parts, word segmentation, and syllabication to spell;
(C) spell high-frequency and compound words from a commonly used list;
(G)  use print and electronic resources to find and check correct spellings.

Listening and Speaking
3.29 Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A) listen attentively to speakers, ask relevant questions, and make pertinent comments; and
(B) follow, restate, and give oral instructions that involve a series of related sequences of action.

(30) Listening and Speaking/Speaking. Students speak clearly and to the point, using the conventions of language. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to speak coherently about the topic under discussion, employing eye contact, speaking rate, volume, enunciation, and the conventions of language to communicate ideas effectively.

(31) Listening and Speaking/Teamwork. Students work productively with others in teams. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to participate in teacher- and student-led discussions by posing and answering questions with appropriate detail and by providing suggestions that build upon the ideas of others.

Social Studies Focus

3.2A identify reasons people have formed communities, including a need for security, religious freedom, law, and material well-being