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  • ELAR/SS: This is Us: Good Citizenship/ Picturing Poetry

ELAR/SS: This is Us: Good Citizenship/ Picturing Poetry

 

Suggested Time Frame: 13 Instructional Days

 

        
Genre Focus

3.4 Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
(A) identify the meaning of common prefixes (e.g., in-, dis-) and suffixes (e.g., -full, -less), and know how they change the meaning of roots; -R
(B) use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or distinguish among multiple meaning words and homographs; -R
(D) identify and apply playful uses of language (e.g., tongue twisters, palindromes, riddles);

As it applies to 3.6 Poetry –
3.5 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories. -S

3.6 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) describe the characteristics of various forms of poetry and how they create imagery (e.g., narrative poetry, lyrical poetry, humorous poetry, free verse). -S

As it applies to 3.6A Narrative Poetry –
3.8 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) sequence and summarize the plot’s main events and explain their influence on future events; -S
(B) describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; -S
(C) identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.

3.10 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author’s sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) identify language that creates a graphic visual experience and appeals to the senses -S

3.16 Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to: -S
(A) understand how communication changes when moving from one genre of media to another;
(B) explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., shape, color, sound).

Writing –
3.18 Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:
(B) write poems that convey sensory details using the conventions of poetry (e.g., rhyme, meter, patterns of verse).

Beginning Reading Skills
3.1 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:
(A) decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns including:
(iii) changing the final “y” to “i” (e.g., baby to babies);
(D) identify and read contractions (e.g., I’d, won’t);
Oral & Written Conventions
3.22 Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A) use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(i) verbs (past, present, and future);
(iv) adverbs (e.g., time: before, next; manner: carefully, beautifully);

3.23 Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
(A) write legibly in cursive script with spacing between words in a sentence;
(C) recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(i) apostrophes in contractions and possessives; and
(ii) commas in series and dates;

3.24 Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(B) spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:
(iii) changing y to i before adding an ending;
(F) spell complex contractions (e.g., should’ve, won’t);

Social Studies Focus
3.11A identify characteristics of good citizenship, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life, and participation in government by educating oneself about the issues, respectfully holding public officials to their word, and voting
3.11B identify historical figures such as Helen Keller and Clara Barton and contemporary figures such as Ruby Bridges and military and first responders who exemplify good citizenship
3.11C identify and explain the importance of individual acts of civic responsibility, including obeying laws, serving the community, serving on a jury, and voting
3.12A give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions
3.12B identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community
3.12C identify examples of nonprofit and/or civic organizations such as the Red Cross and explain how they serve the common good