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  • ELAR/SS: How We Express Ourselves Over Time: Culture/ Literary NonFiction: Learning from the Lives of Others

ELAR/SS: How We Express Ourselves Over Time: Culture/ Literary NonFiction: Learning from the Lives of Others

Suggested Time Frame: 13 Instructional Days

        
Genre Focus

As it applies to 3.9 Literary Nonfiction –
3.5 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories;

As it applies to 3.9 Literary Nonfiction –
3.8 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) sequence and summarize the plot’s main events and explain their influence on future events; -S
(B) describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; -S
(C) identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person.

3.9 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to: -S
(A) explain the difference in point of view between a biography and autobiography.

3.10 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author’s sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) identify language that creates a graphic, visual experience and appeals to the senses. -S

3.16 Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to: -S
(C) compare various written conventions used for digital media (e.g., language in an informal e-mail vs. language in a web-based news article)

Writing –
3.19 Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to:
(A) write about important personal experiences.

3.20 Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
(B) write letters whose language is tailored to the audience and purpose (e.g., a thank you note to a friend) and that use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing);

Beginning Reading Skills

3.1 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students are expected to:
(A) decode multi-syllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common spelling patterns including:
(iv) using knowledge of common prefixes and suffixes (e.g., dis-, -ly);
(v) using knowledge of derivational affixes (e.g., -de, -ful, -able);

Social Studies Focus
3.14A identify and compare the heroic deeds of state and national heroes, including Hector P. Garcia and James A. Lovell, and other individuals such as Harriet Tubman, Juliette Gordon Low, Todd Beamer, Ellen Ochoa, John “Danny” Olivas, and other contemporary heroes
3.14B identify and analyze the heroic deeds of individuals, including military and first responders such as the Four Chaplains
Oral & Written Conventions

3.22 Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A) use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(ii) nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);
(iii) adjectives (e.g., descriptive: wooden, rectangular; limiting: this, that; articles: a, an, the);
(vii) coordinating conjunctions (e.g., and, or, but);
(C) use complete simple and compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.

3.23 Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
(B) use capitalization for:
(ii) historical periods;
(iii) official titles of people;
(C) recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(i) apostrophes in contractions and possessives;
(D) use correct mechanics including paragraph indentations.

3.24 Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(B) spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:
(ii) dropping final “e” when endings are added (e.g., -ing, -ed);
(iv) double consonants in the middle of words;