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  • ELAR/SS: Where we Are: How Does Where we Live Affect How we Live?/ Characters, Moral Lessons, & Comparing Well Known Stories

ELAR/SS: Where we Are: How Does Where we Live Affect How we Live?/ Characters, Moral Lessons, & Comparing Well Known Stories

Suggested Time Frame: 18 Instructional Days

        
Genre Focus
2.5 Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
(A) use prefixes and suffixes to determine the meaning of words (e.g., allow/disallow);
(B) use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or multiple-meaning words;
(C) identify and use common words that are opposite (antonyms) or similar (synonyms) in meaning;

2.6 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) identify moral lessons as themes in well-known fables, legends, myths, or stories; and
(B) compare different versions of the same story in traditional and contemporary folktales with respect to their characters, settings, and plot.

2.9 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(B) describe main characters in works of fiction, including their traits, motivations, and feelings.

2.11 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author’s sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to
(A) recognize that some words and phrases have literal and non-literal meanings (e.g., take steps).

2.18 Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:
(A) write brief stories that include a beginning, middle, and end;

Beginning Reading Skills
2.2 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
(B) use common syllabication patterns to decode words including:
(vi)  vowel digraphs and diphthongs (e.g., boy-hood, oat-meal);
(D) read words with common prefixes (e.g., un-, dis-) and suffixes (e.g., -ly, -less, -ful);
Social Studies Focus
2.7A describe how weather patterns and seasonal patterns affect activities and settlement patterns
2.7B describe how natural resources and natural hazards affect activities and settlement patterns
2.7C explain how people depend on the physical environment and natural resources to meet basic needs
2.7D identify the characteristics of different communities, including urban, suburban, and rural, and how they affect activities and settlement patterns.
Oral & Written Conventions
2.21 Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A) understand and use the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(v) prepositions and prepositional phrases;
(vii) time-order transition words;

2.22 Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
(C) recognize and use punctuation marks, including:
(ii) apostrophes and contractions;

2.23 Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(B) spell words with common orthographic patterns and rules:
(iv) vowel digraphs (e.g., oo-book, fool, ee-feet), diphthongs (e.g., ou-out, ow-cow, oi-coil, oy-toy);
(E) spell simple contractions (e.g., isn’t, aren’t, can’t);