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  • ELAR/SS: This is Us: Good Citizenship / Exploring Informational Text

ELAR/SS: This is Us: Good Citizenship / Exploring Informational Text

Suggested Time Frame: 18 Instructional Days

        
Genre Focus

2.5 Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
(B) use context to determine the relevant meaning of unfamiliar words or multiple-meaning words;

2.13 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author’s purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) identify the topic and explain the author’s purpose in writing the text.

2.14 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about and understand expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A) identify the main idea in a text and distinguish it from the topic;
(B) locate the facts that are clearly stated in a text;
(C) describe the order of events or ideas in a text; and
(D) use text features (e.g., table of contents, index, headings) to locate specific information in text.

2.15 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Text. Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:
(A) follow written multi-step directions; and
(B) use common graphic features to assist in the interpretation of text (e.g., captions, illustrations).

2.16 Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
(A)  recognize different purposes of media (e.g., informational, entertainment);
(B)  describe techniques used to create media messages (e.g., sound, graphics)

Figure 19 Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
(A) establish purposes for reading selected texts based upon content to enhance comprehension;
(C) monitor and adjust comprehension (e.g., using background knowledge, creating sensory images, rereading a portion aloud, generating questions);
(D) make inferences about text using textual evidence to support understanding;
(F) make connections to own experiences, to ideas in other texts, and to the larger community and discuss textual evidence.

Writing –
2.19 Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
(A) write brief compositions about topics of interest to the student

Beginning Reading Skills

2.2 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
(A) decode multisyllabic words in context and independent of context by applying common letter-sound correspondences including:(ii)  consonant blends (e.g., thr, spl);
(B) use common syllabication patterns to decode words including:
(iii)  final stable syllable (e.g., sta-tion, tum-ble);
(iv)  vowel-consonant-silent “e” words (VCe) (e.g., in-vite, cape);
(F)  identify and read contractions (e.g., haven’t, it’s);

Oral & Written Conventions

2.21 Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A) understand and use the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(ii)  nouns (singular/plural, common/proper);
(vi) pronouns (e.g., he, him);
(C) distinguish among declarative and interrogative sentences.

2.22 Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
(B) use capitalization for:
(i)  proper nouns;
(C) recognize and use punctuation marks, including:
(i)  ending punctuation in sentences;
(ii)  apostrophes and contractions; and
(iii)  apostrophes and possessives

2.23 Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(B)  spell words with common orthographic patterns and rules:
(iii)  long vowels (e.g., VCe-hope); and
(E)  spell simple contractions (e.g., isn’t, aren’t, can’t)

Social Studies Focus
2.13A identify characteristics of good citizenship, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life, and participation in government by educating oneself about the issues, respectfully holding public officials to their word, and voting
2.13B identify historical figures such as Paul Revere, Abigail Adams, World War II Women Air force Service Pilots (WASPs) and Navajo Code Talkers, and Sojourner Truth who have exemplified good citizenship
2.13C identify other individuals who exemplify good citizenship
2.13D identify ways to actively practice good citizenship, including involvement in community service
2.14A recite the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States Flag and the Pledge to the Texas Flag
2.14B identify selected patriotic songs, including “The Star Spangled Banner” and “America the Beautiful
2.14C identify selected symbols such as state and national birds and flowers and patriotic symbols such as the U.S. and Texas flags and Uncle Sam
2.14D identify how selected customs, symbols, and celebrations reflect an American love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom