ELAR: Reading Fiction & Writing Personal Narratives

Suggested Time Frame: 14 Instructional Days

        

Genre Focus

4.1 Reading/Fluency. Students read grade-level text with fluency and comprehension. Students are expected to:
(A) read aloud grade-level stories with fluency (rate, accuracy, expression, appropriate phrasing) and comprehension.

4.2 Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
(B)  use the context of the sentence (e.g., in-sentence example or definition) to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words or multiple meaning words; -R
(E)  use a dictionary or glossary to determine the meanings, syllabication, and pronunciation of unknown words. -R

4.3 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A)  summarize and explain the lesson or message of a work of fiction as its theme; -S

4.6 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A)  sequence and summarize the plot’s main events and explain their influence on future events; -R
(B)  describe the interaction of characters including their relationships and the changes they undergo; and -R
(C)  identify whether the narrator or speaker of a story is first or third person. -S

4.8 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author’s sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A)  identify the author’s use of similes and metaphors to produce imagery. -S

4.14 Reading/Media Literacy. Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to: -S
(B)  explain how various design techniques used in media influence the message (e.g., pacing, close-ups, sound effects);
(C) compare various written conventions used for digital media (e.g. language in an informal e-mail vs. language in a web-based news article).

Figure 19 Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
(A)  establish purposes for reading selected texts based upon own or others’ desired outcome to enhance comprehension;
(B)  ask literal, interpretive, and evaluative questions of text;
(C)  monitor and adjust comprehension (e.g., using background knowledge, creating sensory images, re-reading a portion aloud, generating questions);
(D)  make inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding; -S

Writing –
4.17 Writing. Students write about their own experiences. Students are expected to:
(A)  write about important personal experiences. -R

4.18 Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
(B) write letters whose language is tailored to the audience and purpose (e.g., a thank you note to a friend) and that use appropriate conventions (e.g., date, salutation, closing);

Oral & Written Conventions

4.20 Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
(A)  use and understand the function of the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking: -R
(ii)  nouns (singular/plural, common/proper); -S
(iii)  adjectives (e.g., descriptive, including purpose: sleeping bag, frying pan) and their comparative and superlative forms (e.g., fast, faster, fastest); -S
(vi) reflexive pronouns (e.g., myself, ourselves);
(B) use the complete subject and the complete predicate in a sentence;

4.21 Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
(B)  use capitalization for: -R
(ii) titles of books, stories, and essays;
(C)  recognize and use punctuation marks including:
(ii)  quotation marks.

4.22 Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(A) spell words with more advanced orthographic patterns and rules:
(iii) double consonants in middle of words;
(C) spell commonly used homophones (e.g., there, they’re, their; two, too, to);
(D) use spelling patterns and rules and print and electronic resources to determine and check correct spellings.