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  • ELAR/SS: This is Us: The Roles and Responsibilities of People / How We Organize Ourselves as Readers and Writers

ELAR/SS: This is Us: The Roles and Responsibilities of People / How We Organize Ourselves as Readers and Writers

Suggested Time Frame: 14 Instructional Days

    How We Organize Ourselves as Readers and Writers    

Genre Focus

1.6 Reading/Vocabulary Development. Students understand new vocabulary and use it when reading and writing. Students are expected to:
(D) identify and sort words into conceptual categories (e.g., opposites, living things);

As it applies to 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, and 1.5 –
1.8 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Poetry. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of poetry and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

1.9 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Fiction. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the structure and elements of fiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:
(A)  describe the plot (problem and solution) and retell a story’s beginning, middle, and end with attention to the sequence of events;

1.14 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding.

Figure 19 (Teacher model Figure 19 A-F across the year) Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
(A) establish purposes for reading selected texts based upon desired outcome to enhance comprehension;
(C) monitor and adjust comprehension (e.g., using background knowledge, creating sensory images, re­-reading a portion aloud);
(E) retell or act out important events in stories in logical order;
(F) make connections to own experiences, to ideas in other texts, and to the larger community and discuss textual evidence.

Writing –
1.17  Writing/Writing Process. Students use elements of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) to compose text. Students are expected to:
(A)  plan a first draft by generating ideas for writing (e.g., drawing, sharing ideas, listing key ideas);
(B)  develop drafts by sequencing ideas through writing sentences;
(C)  revise drafts by adding or deleting a word, phrase, or sentence;
(D)  edit drafts for grammar, punctuation, and spelling using a teacher-developed rubric; and
(E)  publish and share writing with others.

1.18 Writing/Literary Texts. Students write literary texts to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people, events, and ideas. Students are expected to:
(A) write brief stories that include a beginning, middle, and end;

Beginning Reading Skills

1.1 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Print Awareness. Students understand how English is written and printed. Students are expected to:
(C) sequence the letters of the alphabet;
(D) recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence (e.g., capitalization of first word, ending punctuation);
(E) read texts by moving from top to bottom of the page and tracking words from left to right with return sweep; and
(F) identify the information that different parts of a book provide (e.g., title, author, illustrator, table of contents).

1.2 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonological Awareness. Students display phonological awareness. Students are expected to:
(A)  orally generate a series of original rhyming words using a variety of phonograms (e.g., -ake, -ant, -ain) and consonant blends (e.g., bl, st, tr)
(E) isolate initial, medial, and final sounds in one-syllable spoken word

1.3 Reading/Beginning Reading Skills/Phonics. Students use the relationships between letters and sounds, spelling patterns, and morphological analysis to decode written English. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts. Students are expected to:
(A)  decode words in context and in isolation by applying common letter-sound correspondences, including:
(v)  vowel digraphs including oo as in foot, oo as in moon, ea as in eat, ea as in bread, ee, ow as in how, ow as in snow, ou as in out, ay,ai, aw, au, ew, oa, ie as in chief, ie as in pie, and -igh;
(vi)  vowel diphthongs including oy, oi, ou, and ow;
(C)  use common syllabication patterns to decode words, including:
(i)  closed syllable (CVC) (e.g., mat, rab-bit);
(D) decode words with common spelling patterns (e.g., -ink, -onk, -ick);

Oral & Written Conventions

1.20 Oral and Written Conventions/Conventions. Students understand the function of and use the conventions of academic language when speaking and writing. Students continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:(A)  understand and use the following parts of speech in the context of reading, writing, and speaking:
(i)  verbs (past, present, and future)

1.21 Oral and Written Conventions/Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation. Students write legibly and use appropriate capitalization and punctuation conventions in their compositions. Students are expected to:
(B) recognize and use basic capitalization for:
(i) the beginning of sentences;
(ii)  the pronoun “I”;
(iii)  names of people;
(C)  recognize and use punctuation marks at the end of declarative, exclamatory, and interrogative sentences.

1.22 Oral and Written Conventions/Spelling. Students spell correctly. Students are expected to:
(A)  use phonological knowledge to match sounds to letters to construct known words;
(B)  use letter-sound patterns to spell:
(i)  consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words;
(E) use resources to find correct spellings

Social Studies Focus
1.2A identify contributions of historical figures, including Sam Houston, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King Jr., who have influenced the community, state, and nation
1.2C compare the similarities and differences among the lives and activities of historical figures and other individuals who have influenced the community, state, and nation.
1.12A identify the responsibilities of authority figures in the home, school, and community
1.12B identify and describe the roles of public officials in the community, state, and nation
1.12C identify and describe the role of a good citizen in maintaining a constitutional republic.